Category Archives: sowing resilience and contestation in times of crises

Sowing resilience and contestation in times of crises

By | 19.07.2020

JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it.

sowing resilience and contestation in times of crises

Journal article. Utgivelsesdato Sammendrag Urban gardens have been observed to multiply in response to crises. However, the meaning and motivations behind the emergence of gardening movements varies greatly over space and time.

In this paper we argue that bottom up urban gardening initiatives taking place in Southern European countries in form of land occupation and communalization represent forms of resistance that enhance social cohesion and collective action in times of need.

Specifically, this research examines the role of urban gardens in i building community resilience and ii articulating forms of resistance and contestation to development pressure and commodified urban lifestyles.

Our research is based on data collected among 27 urban gardening initiatives in Barcelona, Spain, including 13 self-governed community gardens and 14 public gardens.

Build Your Resilience in the Face of a Crisis

Data were collected from semi-structured interviews with gardeners and with staff from the Barcelona City Council. Our results show mechanisms through which urban gardens can contribute to build resilience by nurturing social and ecological diversity, generating and transmitting local ecological knowledge, and by creating opportunities for collective action and self-organization.

We further examine collectively managed gardens as urban commons that emerge as a form of resistance to the privatization of public urban space, and that offer opportunities to experiment with new models of urban lifestyles. Hele arkivet. Denne samlingen. Logg inn.Her work as a researcher focuses on ecosystem services from urban gardens in Barcelona, Spain. His work is dedicated to urban ecosystem services and their integrated assessment.

Her doctoral dissertation was embedded in a Spanish project aiming to study biocultural conservation in rural gardens throughout the Iberian Peninsula. Her research focuses on urban and rural agriculture, agroecological transitions and biocultural diversity. His research focuses on the political ecology of urban transformation and urban infrastructure.

He has also done extensive research on water management in Spain and has authored or coauthored more than 25 papers in international scientific journals in the fields of Geography, Urban Studies and Environmental Studies. Ajuntament de BarcelonaEspais verds. Altieri M.

Companioni, K. Murphy, P. Rosset, M. Bourque, and C. Andersson E. Barthel, and K. Anguelovski I. Barthel S. Folke, and J. Parker, and H. Berkes F. Colding, and C. Borowy I. Buchmann C. Cairns J. Camps-Calvet M. Langemeyer, L. Calvet-Mir, and E. MSc Thesis. Cattaneo C. Castells M. Charmaz K. Colding J. De Angelis M. Folke C. Colding, and F. Folke Eds. Pritchard, F. Berkes, J. Colding, and U.It's been rough couple of weeks. The stock market has tanked, a recession looks likely, and the world is facing its first major pandemic.

Nevertheless, many philosophers and deep thinkers have observed that every crisis has a silver lining. With that in mind, here are some quotes to inspire you to not just survive the current crisis but to use it to better your life and increase your chances for future success:.

Top Stories. Top Videos. Innovate Creativity Invent Design Pivot. Getty Images. It wakes you up. Everybody has to face them, and it doesn't make any difference what the crisis is. It shakes you into reflection and healing.

He imposes his own stamp of action, takes responsibility for it, makes it his own. Silently and imperceptibly, as we wake or sleep, we grow strong or weak; and at last some crisis shows what we have become. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The great point is to bring them the real facts. They're going to find you anyway. Kennedy "In crisis times, it's actually not more difficult to motivate your staff, because everyone gets much more focused on how they control their own economic destiny.

In modern times, humor offers us a third alternative; fight, flee - or laugh. Redwine "Maybe it did take a crisis to get to know yourself; maybe you needed to get whacked hard by life before you understood what you wanted out of it. And what I mean by that it's an opportunity to do things you think you could not do before.

sowing resilience and contestation in times of crises

To fortify our minds against the attacks of these calamities and misfortunes should be one of the principal studies and endeavors of our lives.We hope that this message finds you in good health and good spirits, as we live through these difficult times.

At WEDO, similarly to many of you, we have spent the last few weeks thinking through how we move forward as the world continues to shift beneath our feet. What are the appropriate next steps? How can we best show up for our families, our communities, ourselves?

For us, the first step was to turn to our movement allies around the globe, recognizing that our resilience has always come from feminist solidarity. As feminist advocates, part of our work is reflecting on, responding to and planning around these key questions.

However, we cannot underestimate the critical importance of the first reflection, of understanding this as an embodied crisis, deeply intertwined with self-care and mental health. We cannot move forward without an acknowledgement and commitment to collective, compassionate leadership — we will slow down, we will make space for each other, we will allow time to build and time to heal.

This moment requires us to be in community in many ways. This is a critical moment to utilize skills in organizing and advocacy to engage in local mutual aid networks, to create space for collective experience sharing and to re-orient towards urgent policy asks. The work to ensure a just response and recovery, here in the United States and around the globe, is just beginning, and WEDO aims to engage with feminist allies to articulate what a feminist response to COVID looks like.

In all this urgent work, we emphasize three key messages:. We are tasked with the work of analyzing and strategizing about both the positive radical transformations and the many potential negative ones in order to be able to uplift and center feminist solutions.

In this work, WEDO will connect analysis from across our allied networks, from the key principles outlined for a Feminist Green New Dealto the solutions and demands of global climate justice movements, in creating a just and health planet. Finally, WEDO will remain steadfast in its global advocacy for gender equality and environmental integrity.

We have been in touch with many of our key allies over the past few weeks, from movement partners, to Governments and allies in the United Nations — all displaying the collective desire to ensure we move forward in upholding momentum to fighting the interlocking crises of climate change, ecosystem destruction and gender injustice. In the coming weeks and months, we will reach back out to share with you and engage you in some of this continuing work.

We invite you to also share the ongoing work you are doing to uphold critical advocacy in this time of crisis. To bring us back to our starting point, being in community with youour allies, our partners, our friends, is what drives us as individuals and as an organization. We can radically transform our world to meet global crises, if we work with purpose and in solidarity.

Grassroots (Economic) Activism in Times of Crisis: Mapping the Redundancy of Collective Actions

As a personal reflection: in a time where it can be confusing to know where to turn to support, supporting mutual aid networks in our own community in Brooklyn has been both powerful and grounding. For fellow feminists also based in the United States, please check out this document on all mutual aid networks across the country and this mutual aid coordination slack in order to find networks to support and access support.

sowing resilience and contestation in times of crises

We invite all of you to share the networks and initiatives you are building within our larger community, both to welcome participation and to share ideas and knowledge across the world. In Defense of Black Lives. Women and girls around the world are demanding and creating systemic change and a sustainable future for all.

We need collective power to attain a just future — we need you. A special note from the WEDO team, We hope that this message finds you in good health and good spirits, as we live through these difficult times.

Reflections included: This is a deeply personal and embodied crisisone being faced by each and every person in their own intersecting ways. We should fully embrace and lift up feminist leadership in promoting self-care, in being kind and compassionate not only to others but to ourselves, in reaching out to each other and finding comfort in feminist solidarity.

This is a moment that demands re-valuing and centering care. This crisis interlinks deeply with migration and migrant justiceand the impact of closing borders in the long-term has to be understood in the context of human rights. Countries around the globe are implementing punitive and authoritarian measures, focused on the control of people and movement, currently in the context of public health.

What are the long-term impacts of these swift, top-down measures for democratic governance and human rights? How can we remain vigilant in our protection of rights while also supporting measures to combat this pandemic?.

The impact on the realization of sexual and reproductive health and rights will be devastating. What are the implications for multilateralism? What does this mean for critical areas of concern, including climate change, biodiversity, macro-economic issues, health?Published daily by the Lowy Institute.

Covid shows the idea people triumph alone over adversity is a myth — it takes the support and resources of a society. The Covid pandemic is certainly testing all of our resilience. A health crisis is crashing economies and societies. Hospitals are confronted with too little equipment and too few personnel to meet the surge in demand for critical care.

Health care professionals are exhausted and overwhelmed, populations are by turns frightened, defiant, anxious, and some appear in denial. Governments have had to respond to a global crisis of unprecedented proportions, to coordinate that response with others, and to communicate with their citizens about the decisions they make.

But the idea that resilience is an individual attribute that helps people triumph over adversity on their own, without support or resources from others, is a myth.

When we think about resilience as part of our social ecology, it becomes clear that resilience is grounded not in us as individuals alone, but in how well we are able, as individuals and communities, to access and navigate our way toward those people, systems, and resources that can help us when the going gets tough. In other words, it is about our systems rather than just ourselves.

The resilience scholar Michael Ungar identifies seven common principles of systemic resilience across different systems and contexts. These include the idea that resilience really only comes into its own in times of crisis; it is an interactive, interdependent process, not an attribute or characteristic.

It also recognises that systemic resilience sometimes involves trade-offs between different system parts, and resilient systems are open, dynamic and complex. They promote connectivity, demonstrate experimentation and learning, and include diversity, redundancy and participation. The Covid pandemic poses a set of complex, severe, intersecting adversities that challenge systems at all levels, from the individual to the global.

It threatens lives, families, communities, health systems, economies, and everyday connectedness and belonging. But those communities with well-established resources and rhythms for enabling and nurturing social cohesion and cooperation — such as support for the vulnerable, the equitable distribution of goods, services and resources — will be more resilient, even in the face of significant local and global pain and distress. The US is struggling on a number of these resilience yardsticks, despite enormous capacity in health expertise, systemic complexity and redundancy, which has reduced their capacity to adapt and transform rapidly as needed.

Those countries that have learned rapidly from the successes and failures of others are demonstrating a more resilient response than those who continue to adhere rigidly to an existing approach even when challenged by new evidence.

By contrast, a number of other countries have adapted swiftly by being open to new ways of conceptualising, organising, and implementing their responses at very short notice. One example would be Australia, which has largely set aside political party partisan bickering and competition in favour of working together for the safety and wellbeing of its citizens. Not every country around the world has been able to demonstrate similar openness or willingness to shift gears at a time of great uncertainty and risk.

Complexity is a persistent feature of resilient systems. Simpler systems often lack the depth and range needed for critical transformations when things change suddenly. But complexity sometimes needs to be traded off against the need for stark clarity, for example in how health messages about behavioural and social change are communicated in order to keep people safe for as long as possible.

Without this, the dynamism of complex systems can deteriorate quickly into confusion, panic, and resistance. The importance of social connectivity has also been thrown into sharp relief. The global response to the challenge posed by Covid to human social connectivity has been uneven.

On the one hand, we have seen settings globally in which some individuals have privileged their own needs and interests above those of their broader communities, worsening the impact of Covid considerably. On the other hand, new forms of connectivity have emerged with force.Covid shows the idea people triumph alone over adversity is a myth — it takes the support and resources of a society. The Covid pandemic is certainly testing all of our resilience. A health crisis is crashing economies and societies.

Hospitals are confronted with too little equipment and too few personnel to meet the surge in demand for critical care. Health care professionals are exhausted and overwhelmed, populations are by turns frightened, defiant, anxious, and some appear in denial. Governments have had to respond to a global crisis of unprecedented proportions, to coordinate that response with others, and to communicate with their citizens about the decisions they make.

When we think about resilience as part of our social ecology, it becomes clear that resilience is grounded not in us as individuals alone, but in how well we are able, as individuals and communities, to access and navigate our way toward those people, systems, and resources that can help us when the going gets tough.

In other words, it is about our systems rather than just ourselves. It also recognises that systemic resilience sometimes involves trade-offs between different system parts, and resilient systems are open, dynamic and complex.

They promote connectivity, demonstrate experimentation and learning, and include diversity, redundancy and participation. The Covid pandemic poses a set of complex, severe, intersecting adversities that challenge systems at all levels, from the individual to the global. It threatens lives, families, communities, health systems, economies, and everyday connectedness and belonging.

But those communities with well-established resources and rhythms for enabling and nurturing social cohesion and cooperation — such as support for the vulnerable, the equitable distribution of goods, services and resources — will be more resilient, even in the face of significant local and global pain and distress. The US is struggling on a number of these resilience yardsticks, despite enormous capacity in health expertise, systemic complexity and redundancy, which has reduced their capacity to adapt and transform rapidly as needed.

By contrast, a number of other countries have adapted swiftly by being open to new ways of conceptualising, organising, and implementing their responses at very short notice. One example would be Australia, which has largely set aside political party partisan bickering and competition in favour of working together for the safety and wellbeing of its citizens.

Not every country around the world has been able to demonstrate similar openness or willingness to shift gears at a time of great uncertainty and risk. Complexity is a persistent feature of resilient systems. Simpler systems often lack the depth and range needed for critical transformations when things change suddenly. But complexity sometimes needs to be traded off against the need for stark clarity, for example in how health messages about behavioural and social change are communicated in order to keep people safe for as long as possible.

Without this, the dynamism of complex systems can deteriorate quickly into confusion, panic, and resistance.

10 Simple Tips For Resilience In Times Of Crisis

The importance of social connectivity has also been thrown into sharp relief. The global response to the challenge posed by Covid to human social connectivity has been uneven. On the one hand, we have seen settings globally in which some individuals have privileged their own needs and interests above those of their broader communities, worsening the impact of Covid considerably.

On the other hand, new forms of connectivity have emerged with force. Human beings can be almost endlessly creative when it comes to how we connect, and the proxy forms in which we make those connections both felt and meaningful. Yet such connectivity can also become weaponised, as deliberate disinformation by malevolent actors — enabled by enhanced connectivity penetration and reach — creates conditions for the deliberate sowing of dissent, undermining systemic resilience as a result.

When it comes to experimentation and learning, some countries have benefited by learning from the tragedies created by early approaches in countries such as China and Italy. Others, such as the UK, have embarked on early experiments that have resulted in rapid policy changes based on subsequent modelling.

Yet other countries have subsided into fatalism or denial, in which neither experimentation nor learning has been embraced. Redundancy is about having multiple resource bases to meet the same need — for example, the ability to secure local food supply or protective equipment if routine import channels dry up or close down.

The less diversity and the less redundancy, the more vulnerable a system becomes, and the capacity for responding effectively to Covid is illustrating this graphically on a number of fronts in a range of different national and regional global contexts.People are battling fears about the situation and juggling home and work in close proximity.

Almost every employee needs to hear that their dedication is noticed and it matters. Further, gratitude is proven to show improvements in self-esteem, achieving career goals, decision making, productivity, and resilience. Here are five strategies to show more gratitude to your employees and across your organization. First, bring people together for a gratitude shower. Next, tailor your thanks to what the person did and how they like to be appreciated.

Third, make a point to recognized invisible work. Fourth, popularize positivity by creating a pay-it-forward movement in your company. Finally, foster teamwork by working with others to recognize someone in a positive way. My clients, executives in a variety of organizations, feel overworked, underappreciated, and cut off from their colleagues.

sowing resilience and contestation in times of crises

Research clearly indicates expressing gratitude is beneficial to our health and well-being. During a crisis, taking the time to thank others is vital to dampen loneliness, amp up social connections, and generate generosity. Yet, while the benefits of gratitude are widely acknowledged, we feel thankful a lot more often than we express it — and it seems to be least often expressed at work.

For one thing, being thankful to your team is the right thing to do. People are battling fears about the pandemic and juggling home and work in close proximity. Yet for busy and stressed-out leaders, it can be easy to put gratitude at the end of a to-do list. Bring people together for a gratitude shower. Every evening at 7 p. Mandeep created the organizational equivalent of this activity by asking everyone to join a live chat at 4 p.

In this time, team members type out compliments for colleagues. Since these notes are written and saved in a chat, people can scroll through past kudos if they miss a session.

Use this kind of appreciative communication to foster community by coming together for a daily dose of applause. Tailor your thanks.


thoughts on “Sowing resilience and contestation in times of crises

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *